Whale fin dipping down with the words "Audience Honor" in yellow bold and capital letters.

2021 Audience Honors Shorty Award in Facebook Live Category

ADA30 Lead On was established for the 30th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Our goal is to continue to bring recognition to the history, impact, and purpose of the ADA through celebrations of diverse disabled artists, innovators, and advocates and their allies.
At this time in our nation’s collective conscience, we are asked to confront the harsh realities that are residual echoes of the American ”dream.” As in every social justice movement in this nation, the Disability Rights Movement was born out of the unfulfilled parts of America's potential and its unrealized an inaccessible dream. Whether it be for suffragists, Freedom Riders, Stonewall rioters, Feminists, each arose as a response and appeal to the nation - “Do better. BE better.” However, even in those movements, the roles of ableism and racism were and are quite prevalent. That simple truth is what makes these ADA Lead On celebrations even more significant.
ADA30 Logo

Logo description: Two gold comedy and tragedy masks with red and blue accessible (lip-readable) PPE face masks show the smile of comedy and the frown of tragedy, next to a paintbrush that is creating musical staff, and silhouette of Alice Sheppard, a dancer using a wheelchair. The words “ADA30 Lead On” appear prominently at the top. At the bottom, the text continues, “Celebration of Disability Arts, Culture, Education & Pride.”

Calling all talent with non-apparent disabilities in front and behind the camera/keyboard. Applications now open for ADA31 Lead On - Celebrize! Celebrate & Recognize Non-Apparent Disabilities.

From the Production Team of: ADA30 Lead On: Celebration of Disability Arts, Culture, Education & Pride - 2021 Audience Honors Shorty Award Winner; National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) in October 2020; Black Future Month: Legacy, Present & Afro-Futurism in March 2021; and now ADA31 Lead On – Celebrize!

NOW SEEKING TALENT SUBMISSIONS.

*DEADLINE for submissions is Wednesday, June 23 at 9 pm ET*

Apply Here

For more information Click Here

Two gold comedy and tragedy masks with red and blue accessible (lip-readable) PPE face masks show the smile of comedy and the frown of tragedy, next to a paintbrush that is creating musical staff. The words “ADA31 Lead On” appear prominently at the top. At the bottom, the text continues, “Celebrize! Celebrate & Recognize Non-Apparent Disabilities.” Thank you Dan Wilkins for this great logo.

Image description: Two gold comedy and tragedy masks with red and blue accessible (lip-readable) PPE face masks show the smile of comedy and the frown of tragedy, next to a paintbrush that is creating musical staff. The words “ADA31 Lead On” appear prominently at the top. At the bottom, the text continues, “Celebrize! Celebrate & Recognize Non-Apparent Disabilities.” Thank you Dan Wilkins for this great logo.

White letters appear on a black background: “Black Future Month: Legacy, Present & Afro-Futurism.” There is a yellow glow emanating from the word “Afro-Futurism” that is more bold and thicker that the other letters. Above Black Future Month is the ADA30 Lead On logo: Gold comedy and tragedy masks with red and blue accessible (lip-readable) PPE face masks show the smile of comedy and the frown of tragedy, next to a paintbrush that is creating a musical staff, and silhouette of Alice Sheppard, a Black dancer using a wheelchair. The text continues with “Presents’ in red letters. In front of Black Future Month is a Black Power fist with a Black stylized wheelchair user wearing a face visor, fist raised, leaning forward on the seat of a futuristic mobility device not propelled by wheels.

ADA Lead On Productions presents
BLACK FUTURE MONTH:
Legacy, Present & Afro-Futurism

Visit the creators celebrated in this production and more
from the Black Deaf and disability community at their new home:
Black-Future-Month.org

Black and white photo of an African American man sitting in a wheelchair, wearing a white coat and black shirt, looking to the left of the frame.

"Black in blue... we deal with it as it arrives... your travails and trials might leave scars and wounds... they may test your will to continue and may even convince you to do so.... That possibility is just that a - possibility. Merely one of an infinite number of possibilities... the choice is yours. Choose that which is true. Choose you- your potential is infinite and your possibilities are limitless..."

-Keith Jones, Executive Producer

African American man with goatee and glasses, wearing a hat.

"So often the communities with the most to express are given the least opportunity to say it; the important stage that ADA30 LEAD ON productions has cultivated casts an unprecedented and invaluable spotlight on talents who have earned their turn for closer attention."

-Jd Michaels, Executive Producer

African American woman with long hair and wearing a vibrant yellow dress, smiling at the camera.

"Growing up I haven't seen many characters who looked like me or stories that reflected my reality. One of my life's missions is to tell stories authentically from underrepresented communities. My philosophy, create the change you want to see.”

-Tameka Citchen-Spruce, Co-Producer, Creator and host of Black Disabled Representation in Media

A headshot of Black woman who has an afro.

"I'm tired of being hidden, and I'm tired of having to overcompensate just to appease others. I am making myself known whether others understand, like it, or not. I'm taking action, I'm making it happen, I ain't waiting for others to catch up to the brilliance I exude, and this is the exact message Black Future Month is sending on behalf of Black disable people everywhere. Get in tune!!!!!"

-Safiya Eshe Gyasi, Artistic Coordinator, Creator and host of Blazin' Fya

Head shot of African American woman in her 50's, facing forward and smiling, wearing a black shirt with small floral print, grey background.

"Representation matters. It is not only important that we use the powerful tool of the media to tell diverse stories but that authentic and diverse images of disability (authentically cast by talented disabled artists) are an integral and visible part of the stories we see in theater, film and television.”

-Diana Elizabeth Jordan, Talent Outreach Coordinator, Creator and host of SHEREHE!!!!

African American woman wearing a blue head scarf and red lipstick, smiling at the camera.

"It is beautiful to see amazingly talented people with disabilities: visible and invisible, climbing up in the media industry. What’s more impressive is our community being an ongoing inspiration for others to follow. My motto is, give others the motivation to turn dreams into reality.”

-Trelanda R. Lowe “Tree”, Post Production Supervisor and Editor

Caucasian man with a brown beard wears a blue shirt with a badass expression glares into the camera.

“I think of the ADA as an incredible foundation of needed change for people with disability. That foundation is being built upon every year it is in existence by our community. The strength of it supports our progress, our perseverance, and the power of our united voice.”

-Danny Woodburn

Caucasian woman with dark brown hair, pink blouse and dark suit smile into the camera.

"26% of the population – 2% of media – 100% cast and crew of ADA30 Lead On and NDEAM. Media professionals with disabilities own this narrative – In front of and behind the camera. A real gamechanger."

-Tari Hartman Squire

Click any of the buttons below to view shows from the
ADA30 Lead On Series

ADA30 Lead On: Celebration of Disability Art, Culture, Education & Pride

National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM)

Black Future Month: Legacy, Present, and Afro-Futurism (BFM)

Disability Rights 3

Photo by Tom Olin, The Olin Collection group of disabled activists using wheelchairs are watching another activists take a sledge hammer to the curb at the Hollywood Walk of Fame to create a curb cut.

Lead Sponsor

In addition to AT&T as Lead Sponsor for both ADA30 Lead On and NDEAM, its Disability Employee Resource Group Ability is also engaged with an important message about mental health and suicide prevention in the workplace.

Gold Sponsor

Colorful letters spell out Google.,
Other sponsors include

Comcast NBCUniversal; Telemundo; Easterseals Disability Film Challange; EIN SOF Communications; Facebook; The Foundation for Global Sports Development & Sidewinder Films; Kessler Foundation; Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation; PolicyWorks; Sony Pictures; TransCen/Mid-Atlantic ADA Center; and Wells Fargo.

Partners

Black Hollywood Education & Resource Center (BHERC); Be Influential Films; Blaq Gurl Fya; Bourgeois Magazine LA; Bridge Multimedia; Bus Door; Dreaming Big on a Swing Entertainment; EIN SOF Communications; Exceptional Minds; Fashionably Tardy; Fun4The Disabled; Interpret This!; KripHop Nation; Lights! Camera! Access!; michaels.adams.; Michigan Disability Rights Coalition; Mulberry Tree Group; SignWorld Studios; SoulFul Media Works; 3 Play Media; Visionaries of the Creative Arts (VOCA); and Woman of Her Word.

Lead On: The Life and Legacy of Justin Dart

"I call for solidarity among all who love justice, all who love life, to create a revolution that will empower every single human being to govern his or her life, to govern the society and to be fully productive of life quality for self and for all."

-Justin Dart

Disability Talent Resources

Six multicolor triangular shaped objects point into a circle, representing the six areas of media – television, film, advertising, news, theatre and interactive Underneath, the words Lights! Camera! Access! appear in blue font.

Lights! Camera! Access! (LCA) has three objectives – 1) to increase disability employment in front of and behind the camera/keyboard across delivery platforms – TV, films, advertising, news, theatre, and interactive; 2) to improve disability portrayals and; 3) ensure access to media through captions and audio descriptions.

Website:
EINSOFcommunications.com

White letters appear on a black background: “Black Future Month: Legacy, Present & Afro-Futurism.” There is a yellow glow emanating from the word “Afro-Futurism” that is more bold and thicker that the other letters. Above Black Future Month is the ADA30 Lead On logo: Gold comedy and tragedy masks with red and blue accessible (lip-readable) PPE face masks show the smile of comedy and the frown of tragedy, next to a paintbrush that is creating a musical staff, and silhouette of Alice Sheppard, a Black dancer using a wheelchair. The text continues with “Presents’ in red letters. In front of Black Future Month is a Black Power fist with a Black stylized wheelchair user wearing a face visor, fist raised, leaning forward on the seat of a futuristic mobility device not propelled by wheels.

Visit the creators celebrated in this production and more from the Black Deaf and disability community at their new home.

Website:
Black-Future-Month.org

A representation of the letters D and A made up of geometric shapes that are different shades of blue.

DisArt believes that expressions of a Disabled cultural identity can transform society from awareness to understanding to belonging, creating a community that enjoys the full and equitable participation of all Disabled people.

Website:
https://www.disartnow.org/

In between two laurel branches, appears a PPE mask with the words Easterseals Disability Film Challenge Home Edition.

The Easterseals Disability Film Challenge is a weekend-long filmmaking contest, originally launched in 2014 by actor, now also ESSC Board Member, Nic Novicki. Open to all, the challenge provides a platform for new voices in the entertainment industry.

Website:
disabilityfilmchallenge.com